Jersey Bull Blues

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Overview

This is another song from Patton’s final handful of recordings, done in late January 1934, just months before he’d pass away. It takes after his classic Spanish tuning songs such as Highwater Everywhere Pt. 1, Moon Going Down, and others. In it, he utilizes his famous string-snapping bass-riff on the I chord to begin each chorus; a move that appeared to have been a strong influence on others like Willie Brown and Son House.

Workstation

Open G — DGDGBD
2nd Fret

If you got a good bullcow, you ought to keep your bull, bull at home
If you got a good bullcow, you ought to keep your bull, bull at home
Boy, keep that bull at home
Say, may come along a young heifer and just tow your bull from home

Oh, my bull’s in the pasture, babe, Lord, where there’s no grass
Yeah, my bull’s, Lord, where there’s no grass
Boy, no grass in the pasture
I swear every minute, it seems like it’s going to be my last

And my bull got a horn long as my arm
And my bull got a horn, babe, long as my arm
Boy, long as my arm
My bull got a horn long as my arm

Oh, a five pound ax and I’ll cut two different ways
I’ve an old five pound ax and I’ll cut two different ways
Boy, cut my woman both night and day
And I cut my little woman both night and day

I’ve an old five pound ax and I just dropped in your town
I’ve an old five pound ax and I just dropped in your town
Boy, I got women, now, behind me
I got women, now, behind me, just try that old ax on down

And I remember one morning between midnight and day
Ah, sure
And I remember one morning between midnight and day
Boy, I were way upstairs
I were way upstairs throwing myself away

Song History

30 January 1934
New York City
Vocalion 02782

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